Hardcore Software

How hard it can get?

Testing source code posting January 12, 2010

Filed under: Life — Hemant @ 6:04 pm

File.Exists (@"C:\Crap.txt");

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Who will be boss??? February 26, 2009

Filed under: Humour,Life — Hemant @ 3:27 pm

I cant help but share a recent joke that I read somewhere:

When God made man, all the parts of the body argued over who would be boss. The brain explained that since he controlled all the parts of the body, he should be boss. The legs argued that since they took the man wherever he wanted to go, they should be boss.

The stomach countered with explanation that since he digested all the food, he should be boss. The eyes said that without them, man would be helpless, so they should be boss. Then the asshole applied for the job. The other parts of the body laughed so hard that the asshole become mad and closed up. After a few days the brain went foggy, the legs got wobby, the stomach got ill, thr eyes got crossed and unable to see. They all cenceded and made the asshole boss. This proves that you dont’ have to be a brain to be boss…. just an asshole will do!!!

 

Did you know? August 22, 2007

Filed under: Life — Hemant @ 4:50 pm
  • William Huskisson was a British member of parliament. He was run down by a train during the opening of first railway in 1830.
  • Thomas Midgley was an American inventor who was strangled in 1944 by a machine he had invented to help him move after contracting polio. He invented three products that have since been found to be environmentally harmful: lead in petrol, CFCs in fridges and aerosols and the insecticide DDT.
  • Last words of French Queen Marie Antoinette (1893), who accidentally trod on her executioner’s foot as she went to the guillotine: “Pardonnez-moi monsieur” (Pardon me, Sir).
  • Last word of Joseph Henry Green, a British doctor (1863), after checking his own pulse: “Stopped.”
  • Some non-Catholic countries such as Britain refused to adopt the Gregorian calender at first. The Julian calender, previously used in Britain was based on a solar year, the time taken for the earth to rotate around the Sun. This is 365.25 days, which is fractionally too long (it is actually 365.24219 days), so the calender steadily fell out of line with the seasons. In 1752, Britain decided to correct this by abandoning the Julian calender in favour of the Gregorian. By doing so, 3 September instantly became 14 September – and, as a result, nothing whatsoever happened in British history between 3 and 13 September 1752. Many people believed their lives would be shortened. They protested in the streets, demanding, “Give us back our 11 days!”
  • If we put the history of the Universe into the scale of a calender year, i.e. Big Bang on 1 Jan (midnight), then:
    • Earth formed on 12 September
    • First many-celled life formed on 18 December
    • First dinosaur on 24 December
    • Extinction of dinosaurs on 28 December
    • Homo sapiens (modern human) appears on 31Dec (11:55 PM)
    • Everything that happened in last 475 years takes place in less than the last second of the last minute of the year!

 

Top 5 most used commands in MS Office June 14, 2007

Filed under: Life,Quotes,Software,Web — Hemant @ 7:02 pm

Here is an interesting post I came across. Can you guess what are 5 most used commands in MS office?

Here is the answer!

 

Think before you speak

Filed under: Humour,Life,Quotes,Software — Hemant @ 6:59 pm

Taken from another blog:

The classic example is the Sony Walkman which was universally panned because it did not record, but only played tapes. The rest is history. But here are a couple of quotes that are hard to believe these days:

In reference to the Apple Macintosh, Windows, and GUI

  • “The Mac simply doesn’t have the look or feel of a business computer.” (InfoWorld, March 26, 1984)
  • “A few traditional computer users see the mouse, the windows, and the desktop metaphor as silly, useless frills.” (Byte, May 1984)
  • “‘Icons represent an attempt to restrict what people do with computers, in the guise of user-friendliness.’ According to Currie, icon-based systems are appropriate for novice computer users, but will hinder the work of knowledgeable users.” (Computerworld, August 20, 1984, interview with Edward H. Currie, president of Lifeboat Associates, a New York-based software publishing firm)
  • “Because works the way you do, you don’t waste time with a mouse or learning a Macintosh-like graphics environment. works the way PC software is supposed to work.” (Ashton-Tate brochure for Byline Desktop Publishing, 1988)

In reference to the mouse peripheral device

  • [headline] “Mice are nice ideas, but of dubious value for business users” (George Vinall, PC Week, April 24, 1984)
  • “I was having lots of fun, but in the back of my corporate mind, I couldn’t help but think about productivity.” (George Vinall, PC Week, April 24, 1984)
  • “Does the mouse make the computer more accessible, more friendly, to certain target audiences such as executives? The answer is no.” (Computerworld, October 31, 1983)
  • “There is no possibility that this device will feel more comfortable to the executive than the keyboard. Because of its “rollability,” the mouse has the aura of a gimmick….” (Computerworld, October 31, 1983)
  • “The mouse and its friends are merely diversions in this process. What sounds revolutionary does not necessarily help anyone with anything, and therein lies the true test of commercial longevity.” (David A. Kay, Datamation, October 1983)
 

Disposable email ID May 21, 2007

Filed under: Life,Software,Web — Hemant @ 7:00 pm

When was the last time you were surfing a site and want to try a software out. You click on download and it asks for your email id?
When was the last time you want to see just a conversation thread in a forum and it forces you to register (asking your email Id) before letting you see the conversation?
When was the last time you wanted to register to some site by are afraid of spams?

If any of above web annoyances happened to you, the solution is mailnator!

What mailnator does is exactly what you want. It creates a disposable email id for you every time you open mailnator homepage. And you can even check your emails (for registration confirmation, trial keys etc.) and email Id will automatically be deleted after few hours…

 

Moving to .NET Platform, A difficult choice? May 20, 2007

Filed under: .NET,Delphi,Life,Software — Hemant @ 5:20 pm

I am working on a product which is developed using Delphi for Win32. Originally Delphi 7 was used and we then moved to Delphi 9 (Delphi 2005) and are now planning to move to Delphi 10 (Delphi 2006). I have to admit that despite the originally reluctance in accepting the Delphi as the long term development technology, I have now grown to simply love it. You know what I like about Delphi most? The fact that it solves the real world problems!

You know there is lot of technology talk always going on. Every second day you hear the announcement of a new language, new database technology, new framework which would just magically solve all your problems. But if you have worked even for few months in software industry (as I have), you will realize there is no such thing which can solve all our problems magically. Language, framework and components just assists you do your job and *nothing* can replace a good programmer. Still Delphi provides the simple to understand and simple to use framework which suits most developers. This is because real developers like to find the “most appropriate way” to solve a problem in given time and resources and not essentially the “best way”. Lengthy and exhaustive time, performance, use analysis is luxury of few developers, who program in a garage and for fun.

Everything was working fine until my organization had to think “What to do about .NET platform? Do we need to go for it?”

After thinking for sometime, I concluded couple of points:

  1. Developers (who actually get to work on product) like to work on a technology which is popular in market. Perhaps it makes them feel safer that it will not be too difficult to find another job, just in case. If you ask “Why you like to work on .NET?” it would be difficult for them to answer. Perhaps the only answer is “because every second person seems to talk about .NET”.
  2. It doesn’t matter to the organization whether its developers are using .NET or Java or Delphi; it wants to deliver the right solutions to customer at right time.

During my initial couple of months in software development, I used to find so many problems with existing code/structure/design etc. Even a stupidly named variable would drive me nuts. It’s not that now I don’t care about how variable are named but you just can’t make everyone to name variables like you. You have to adjust somewhat somewhere. I always liked to do things the perfect way and I still do, but now I also think “what is more important? Renaming the variable to my taste in 20 odd units or shipping the product to customer next week?” Don’t take me wrong, I am a real nasty person in this regard; I would still rename the variable in 20 odd units but only in next planned release!

In coming few days, a decision will be made by me and few senior people (who I actually admire). Lets see what comes up!